INFOGRAPHIC: Calories vs. Price (Via: The Ration)

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The Ration's Logo

The Ration's Logo

I discovered a new source of information this morning while cruising the internet, a site called “The Ration.” The article that brought me to the site was called Calories Vs. Price and was written by: Andrea Jezovit, in it she does an interesting comparison of cost vs. calories of fresh foods and selected processed foods. Andrea’s interests peak my interests as they align with things I am working on as well: web geek, web development, data visualization and an interest in food health.

 

The first article that caught my attention did so with a interactive graphic! Who doesn’t love interactive graphics with colors, dots, lines and loaded. So what was this “magic graphic” you ask?

In it they used 30 common grocery items ranging from fruits, vegetable, soft drinks, snacks and meats then compared their calorie content and cost per serving. Below you can see the interesting chart they built detailing their findings. Not only did they detail the cost per serving but also includes the salt and sugar levels per serving. (be still my heart)

 

                         

 

Their conclusion, per The Ration’s article titled Food: Calories vs. Price  (writen on July 27, 2011)  is this:

Our findings corroborate Drewnowski’s: processed convenience foods and snack foods generally cluster towards the low cost and high,calorie, high sodium and high sugar section of the graph, while more nutritious and lower calorie options like fresh meat and vegetables fall on the expensive end of the spectrum.

SOURCES:  Prices collected from Safeway.com on July 19, 2011 for area code 94720. Where possible, serving sizes and nutritional info taken from food label information available at Safeway.com. Nutritional information for fresh/cooked foods taken from the USDA National Nutrient Database, based on typical serving sizes. Beverage weights in grams calculated with density information from Aqua-Calc.com.

Exploring other areas of The Ration should be fun and educational. Looking at their about page gives the following details as to who they are:

This is a News21 project on food and health by the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism along with students from University of Missouri, Harvard University and City University, London. This program is funded by a grant from the Carnegie Corporation and the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation.

So what do you think, do you like this chart and do you think you would like to hear more about what is being reported in The Ration?